Apple Lisa

Lisa_001

Each month one of Microcomputer Printout’s team of experts gives a vast amount of free publicity to a product they happen to like. Julian Allason opted for Apple’s new LISA – because, quite simply, it works the way you do.

Soft Soap

Julian Allason is critical of LISA’s Software.

“A soft answer turneth away wrath” says the Bible’s book of Proverbs. And answers to the microcomputer problem come no softer than LISA. Indeed, so friendly is she that the doyen of micro dealers, Mike Sterland, professed himself worried that existing Apple clients might be jealous at the thought of mere newcomers enjoying her sundry charms.

There can be little double that what I suppose we must call the LISA operating system – although it is so transparent as to be invisible – is superbly executed. After a few minutes one is merrily scuttling the mouse across the table top; selecting here; opening there; consigning files to the waste basket, and drawing the prettiest of pictures. To the experienced hacker, the sheer joy of being able to see what files are open; what jobs remain to be done; whose birthday is impending; is little short of a revelation. Beginners soon take it for granted – which is perhaps the highest accolade of all.

Lisa_002

The movable mouse with its single ‘select’ button is used to point to a function on the screen

Lisa_003

But is the applications software (although again this is a term Apple wouldn’t dream of using) as good? I fear not.

Like the curate’s egg, it is good in parts. The authoritative Rosen Electronics Letter, describes them, with the exception of LISADrawer and LISAProject as ‘pedestrian versions of standard functions that have been better done elsewhere’. Quite so. The point, however, is the degree of integration between them. Unhappily, even this is not as comprehensive as it might have been. The LISAWrite word processor for example does not allow you to insert information from the other applications, except by adding an extra page to the document you are working from.

If you are the sort of writer who needs fancy functions like footnote management and indexing, you would be frankly better off with Wordstar (and it is just a matter of time before that appears on LISA). On the other hand LISAWrite gives you lots of type faces and sizes to play with. And you can print them all out exactly as they appear on the screen, using both Apple’s new dot matrix printer, and, amazingly, the daisywheel printer. Most of the usual functions for manipulating text are there, and in my humble judgement, the program is more than adequate.

Much the same judgement must apply to LISACalc, which would be a fairly run-of-the-mill first generation spreadsheet if it didn’t offer variable column widths and one or two other goodies. One criticism levelled at it is the absence of multi-sheet consolidation, a feature which might have been expected to appeal to the corporate users who supposedly constitute LISA’s target market.

LISAGraph offers the usual types of business graphs in four different sizes. Thanks to the 720×364 dot resolution of the 12” screen, they look a lot better than on most other micros. Up to seven different sets of data can be held, and converted into graphic form.

This data can either be keyed in directly as a set of values, or moused over from the Calc program. The point that caught the eye of almost all lucky enough to have had a sneak preview of the system, was the way in which the graphs change automatically following any amendment to the data. Clever stuff!

LISA Terminal is optional, and it sounds like, and emulates DEC VT100 and VT52 modem and terminals. IBM 3270 emulation is likely to be included by the time LISA goes on sale here sometime this summer (is September still the summer? “It’s real hot out here in September,” says my chum in Cupertino with a wink).

And now the exciting bits. LISADraw is astonishing. If you’re drunk it will even straighten out your lines. Combine it with LISAGraph or LISAProject and the results get to look very professional indeed. The first time I saw LISA the demonstrator, Apple’s Brian Reynolds, created first one, then a whole series of drawings of LISA just by selecting from lines, shapes and shading with the mouse. And, Apple II users please note, text can go anywhere on the screen.

LISAProject is for critical path analysts. I’m no expert on project management, but even I could understand the schedules when they were displayed in graphical form, showing the critical paths amongst tasks, represented by boxes containing the details of the resources required, and milestones. In true calc fashion the critical path can be changed to take into account changes in resources – more Irishmen hired, a compressor stolen, for example – or unexpected delays. Once the output has been tarted up using LISADraw, the results are well up to management consultancy standards.

The last application is LISAList which is really a sort of database for dumbos. I’m not sure why it’s been billed as a list management package as several of the more standard mailing list functions seem to be missing; ditto a proper report generator.

Apple would probably argue that LISAList is intended for general use rather than high powered mailing or database management. Packages dedicated to precisely these applications may be expected sometime in the future. Quite when, however, remains a bit of a mystery. As I write, more than a month after the launch, the LISA development toolkit has yet to appear, and latest word is that it is unlikely to be before June. Without it third party software houses are going to have difficulty writing any applications programs that exploit LISA’s true capabilities. Without those programs LISA could turn into a seven month wonder.

The computer supports Pascal, BASIC, and COBOL languages so the problems are hardly insoluble. The onus must also be on Apple to get out and sell LISA in quantity. These self-same software houses subscribe to a strictly commercial code. Commandment 1 of this states that Thou Shalt Only Convert Software for Machines with a Large User Base’.

So different and so special is LISA it can truly be said to have a user base of zero.

But perhaps not for long. I, for one, have placed my order.

Lisa – An Expensive Lady?

In counterpoint to the otherwise noisy proceedings at LISA’s launch was the silence that greeted the announcement of the price – the sterling equivalent of $10,000 plus travelling expenses.

With the pound sick, and the gnomes tremulous, that translates to something like £7,500 – a lot of anyone’s money for what is still essentially a personal computer. Have Apple blown LISA’s chances then?

Some of the more cynical dealers thought not. “No one knows better what the market will bear than Keith Hall,” remarked one computer retailer, who had known the rugger-playing Sales Director in his incarnation as Commodore’s marketing mafioso. The existence of a market at that sort of price level is certainly not in doubt. Xerox have demonstrated that by selling every 8010 work station – the only piece of hardware remotely comparable to LISA – at over £11,000 each.

The other conclusion reached by the trade, after the customary head scratching, was that when LISA does arrive it could be in short supply. Indeed Apple have already indicated their intention of restricting LISA dealerships to a select few. The official explanation is that only the most experienced business systems houses would be able to do justice to the new baby. Quite how this squares with Apple’s claim (probably justifiable) that LISA is so easy to use that it can be learned in twenty minutes, is anyone’s guess.

Rumour, that oft ill-informed lady, has it that the original UK target price was £6,500; that was before the gnomes weighed in and sterling tumbled. There seems also to have been genuine disagreement on price within Apple. Sources close to the company’s Cupertino headquarters talk of two distinct schools of thought, one favouring a ’low’ price around the $8,000 mark with a view to maximising the company’s advantage in being first. A second group is said to have canvassed a $12,000 price tag on the basis that this would generate the optimum revenue, given the inevitable supply problems during the first year.

In the event, Apple’s chief executive, Mike Markkula, seemed to have split the difference, conscious perhaps that LISA’s market lead had been whittled down by successive software delays.

The unknown factor in the LISA price equation is Macintosh, LISA’s little brother. The conundrum now entertaining Cupertino’s corporate types is this: how cheaply can we make Little Mac?

Like LISA Macintosh is based on the Motorola 68000 16-bit microprocessor. Like LISA it should run much the same software. But will it? Like Topsy, LISA’s software just grew and grew and now occupies more than two megabytes of memory in all. Any possibility of marketing a floppy only version of LISA went out of the window more than a year ago; hence the presence of the separately boxed Profile five megabyte hard disk. Exactly the same problem now arises with Little Mac.

One theory now current amongst Apple watchers proposes $10,000 as an artificially high price for LISA, simply in order to maintain market separation from Macintosh. All this speculation – for speculation it largely is – is based on the assumption that LISA is overpriced. But is it? Try as one may, it is hard to put together a 68000-based system with Hi Res graphics, a megabyte of RAM, five megabytes of Winchester storage and half a dozen or so applications packages and still find oneself with much change from £8,000. And what price user friendliness?

LISA may not be within reach of everyone’s pocket, but it certainly looks like good value to me.

Which side of the Blanket?

Julian Allason examines Lisa’s parentage…

Lisa_004

The Xerox Star was the first workstation to employ the multiple-window technique. More recently Visicorp announced Vision for the IBM PC.

Frowns outweighed smiles as microcomputer folk reacted to the launch of Apple’s LISA computer last month.

The most maniacal grin adorned the visage of Apple’s rugger playing Marketing Director, Keith Hall, as he exhorted his dealers into orgasms of excitement at the prospect of selling the wonder micro.

The details of LISA, which will not have come as a very great surprise to readers of this organ, brought a furrow to the brows of competitors. “Now everyone will want integrated software,” moaned one small British microcomputer manufacturer. “Look how long that took Apple to develop – and we don’t have a fraction of their resources.”

Ecstasy was also less than unanimous amongst dealers. “Apple have wrecked the market. I’ve already had two of my best customers call to put a freeze on further orders. The worst part is that Apple won’t even be able to deliver LISAs for six months and then not in any quantity,” complained one member of the Computer Retailers’ Association.

Wry smiles were the order of the day in Uxbridge, headquarters of Xerox, makers of LISAs only competitor, the 8010 workstation, otherwise known as the Star. As noted elsewhere on these pages, LISA owes much of its heritage to work done at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center. Work that culminated in the Alto prototype user friendly computer. From the Alto – so far the only personal computer to have achieved true cult status – sprang from the aforementioned Star.

When industry pundits take a step back from the trees to inspect the wood, they will notice something very odd. Working from the same starting point, Apple reached a very different – one is tempted to say the opposite – conclusion from Xerox. For the Star is viewed by Xerox as a workstation for their Ethernet local area network. Apple, on the other hand, are adamant that LISA is a one-man machine, a personal computer that will adorn the desk of professional managers.

It is a curious conflict and one is tempted to wonder whether both companies can be right.

In truth not even Apple are convinced that they enjoy a monopoly of wisdom. As one senior manager remarked, after looking round to ensure that we were not being overhead, “In scientific circles the very best rows start with opposing conclusions being drawn from the same data…”

But it may not even be a two sided argument, because VisiCorp, whose VisiON operating environment has received the rough edge of Apple’s corporate tongue, think they are dealing with a very different sort of animal. If one could reconstruct the chain of evolution of the concepts first developed at Xerox PARC and Stanford University, it might go something like this: Alto user friendly personal computer becomes the Star workstation, a single component in a network of stations sharing printing and file storage resources, but its principal function is to exchange information.

As a personal computer company, Apple find other aspects of the Alto more sympathetic. The use of multiple screen windows, the mouse as a pointer to them, and of icons (small graphic symbols) to indicate the status of the work in hand all appeal. The network emphasis less so. Apple see the integration of the most popular office applications as a means of closing the gap between computers and office functions as they are normally (i.e. manually) carried out.

At the bottom of the chain, or at least as far down as we can see for the nonce, is VisiCorp. In their world view the PARC concept is primarily a means of making applications programs more user friendly. Not surprisingly, the first programs to receive the VisiON treatment will be VisiCalc, VisiWord, VisiPlot, VisiTrend, Visi etc. And least anyone deprecate that, your correspondent would like to add that he was enormously impressed the first time he sat down with VisiON. Moreover, the system has received the imprimatur of mega-mini-computer-maker Digital Equipment Corporation. In the computer world this is the equivalent of not just a feather in the cap for VisiCorp, but a whole bird in their bonnet.

Whether future micro biological expeditions down this particular evolutionary train will be warranted in the future remains to be seen. Certainly there are some interesting growths under culture in the labs of Microsoft and Digital Research. Our microscopes will be trained in their direction over the coming months…

First published in Microcomputer Printout magazine, April 1983

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Multiplan

Mike Liardet looks at Multiplan – Microsoft’s entry to the spreadsheet fray.

After releasing the Apple version of Visicalc about three years ago, Visicorp enjoyed at least 18 months completely unchallenged in the market for what has now become known as spreadsheet software. But in the last year and a half there has been a steady stream of Visicalc rivals arriving on the scene and, naturally, some of the established companies have been getting involved in this growth area.

Probably the best known of all the micro software companies, Microsoft’s pedigree goes right back to those prehistoric days of ‘core-store’, paper-tape and teletypes – 1975 in fact, when the first of a million microcomputer systems was equipped with a Microsoft Basic interpreter. Now Microsoft has augmented its own spreadsheet system: Multiplan. Will Multiplan further enhance Microsoft’s reputation for excellence? Will it be another Ford Edsel? (You should get this point if you have heard of a Ford Edsel and you definitely will if you haven’t!)

The first thing that strikes you when confronted with a copy of Multiplan is the packaging: Microsoft has obviously invested a lot of effort (and money as well, I am sure) in presenting its ‘new baby’ to maximum advantage. A heavy-duty transparent plastic case holds a substantial ring-bound manual, system disks, various leaflets and a few pieces of carefully positioned cardboard mouldings – simply there to mask out awkward gaps and present an uncluttered appearance through the transparent box. Readers who are concerned by such a flagrant wastage of the world’s resources on a mere piece of marketing-hype will doubtless be relieved to learn that you need not throw the box away after purchase – it readily converts into a sweet little bookstand to support your manual!

Anyway, underneath the packaging we eventually find the disks – my review copy was for the Apple II (DOS 3.3), but Multiplan is also available for The Apple III, CP/M systems and, of course, Microsoft’s MS-DOS. All versions are evidently functionally identical, with just a few pages at the start of the manual outlining any minor differences, so non-Apple owners should still bear with me! (I also had the opportunity to take a quick look at the MSDOS version on a Sirius, so have made occasional references to this, too. In particular, I have included benchmark results for the Sirius version, specifically to check out Multiplan’s performance with a new generation (8088) processor and all that extra memory capacity.)

Getting started

Getting started proved fairly easy – the ‘First Time’ instructions were not on page 1, where I like to see them, but a little bit of page-thumbing soon tracked them down. A bit of disk copying, data disk initialisation, and two or three minutes later I was faced with a reassuringly familiar display of a spreadsheet. The only hold-up in all this was to have a good chuckle at the latest piece of computer jargon, encountered in the instructions for seeking the system for optional (on the Apple) 80-column display mode: ‘Recable’ – to exchange 40-column video cable connection with 80-column!

The initial display is of the top left hand corner of the spreadsheet, showing seven spreadsheet columns and 20 rows, all completely blank. The remainder of the display is devoted to helpful prompts: the names of twenty different ‘commands’, a ‘what to do now’ message and status information, such as percentage of storage space remaining, current cursor position, etc. Both rows and columns are identified by numbers, unlike many systems which use the alphabet for column headings. The repercussions of this are fairly great, since whereas ‘Q99’ is unambiguously a reference to a specified cell, ‘1799’ clearly is not. Multiplan provides several alternatives for identifying cells, but the simplest is that they be written as ‘RyCx’ – eg, ‘R17C99’ – a little bit longer than ‘Q99’!

Moving around

Moving the cursor around the spreadsheet is very simple – single control-key hits (ie. simultaneously pressing ‘Control’ and one other key) move the cursor left, right, up and down, with the VDU screen window being ‘pulled along’ by the cursor if an attempt is made to move to a cell off the edge of the screen. Sensibly, the keys that achieve this movement are arranged in a diamond (on the Sirius the arrow keys are used) – easy to remember and easy to touch-type when you are looking at the screen. Further investigation reveals that there are also control-key hits to ‘home’ the cursor to the top left hand cell and to the bottom-right, and a ‘Go-to’ command where destination coordinates can be typed in, as well as a rapid scrolling facility where the cursor is moved several cells at one go.

Also of particular interest is a very powerful split-screen facility. The screen can be subdivided into display areas (called ‘windows’ in the manual), each displaying different parts of the spreadsheet, and the cursor can be quickly ‘jumped’ from one to the next. There are many possible uses for this: locking row and column headings for continual display, quick movement between different parts of the spreadsheet, and keeping totals or whatever continually in view when other parts of the spreadsheet are being modified. Moreover each window can be displayed with a nice surrounding border, and can also be ‘linked’ to another window so that columns or rows in both always line up correctly. If all this sounds a little confusing to the newcomer, then take heart. You can completely ignore the facility at first, but once you are ready for it, the chances are that however you want to lay-out your display then Multiplan will accommodate you.

Entering data

As with most spreadsheet systems, the ‘bread and butter’ activity centres on entering or changing numbers, titles and formulae. To achieve this, simply move the cursor to the cell to be changed and start typing whatever is required there. The only thing to watch out for is that text entry must be preceded by selecting ‘Alpha’ mode (simply press ‘A’ before typing the text) otherwise the chances are Multiplan will assume you are entering a command – occasionally disastrous. For example, a sensible abbreviation for Total-Costs-Yacht could be ‘TCY’. Enter this without pressing ‘A’ and Multiplan does a ‘Transfer-Clear-Yes’ wiping out the entire spreadsheet! Don’t believe it could happen? A PCW editor (I’ll spare his blushes) did it! Well, it probably wasn’t a yacht, but a yo-yo or a yard-of-ale or something…

The formulae themselves can be built up using a wide range of maths and other functions, including trig, standard deviation, string concatenation, logical and table look-up, etc. The notation used is the classic keyboard version of school maths notation, easily learned by anyone not already familiar with it. As we have already mentioned, formula references to cells require an RyCx’ notation – eg, the formula to add the first 2 cells on the first row could be written as ‘R1C1 + R1C2’. However, there is a little trap lurking for experienced spreadsheet users – the replication facility does no formula adjustment whatsoever. Thus, if the above formula was located at R1C3, and then copied to 99 cells below, each and every copy would be ‘R1C1 + R1C2’ and the expected Column 3 = Column 1 + Column 2 would not be achieved. It turns out that the original formula, quite correct if no replication is envisaged, should be ‘RC[-2| + RC[-1)’, meaning ‘add cell in current row two columns back, to one in current row one column back’. Now, wherever this formula is located, it will add together the two previous values on the row, and in particular, if replicated right down column 3 it will do the column sum correctly.

If typing ‘RC[-2] + RC[-1]’ seems like a bit of a fingerful (tactile equivalent of mouthful) then Multiplan to the rescue! Instead of working out ‘RC[-2]’, etc, simply use cursor moves in mid-formula entry and Multiplan will type in the formula for you. In the above example only the ‘+’ need be entered from the keyboard, the rest of the formula being built up by using the cursor to point to the cells to be referenced.

It is also possible to refer to cells by their row or column name and thus build up formulae like ‘profit = sales – costs’. Since (a) this is immediately comprehensible and (b) always replicates correctly, the extra typing involved is well worth it!

In conclusion, I must say that I did not greatly like Multiplan’s methodology for referencing cells. It should be noted that cell references occur not only in formulae, but are also required by the majority of commands (see below), so a major part of one’s time at the keyboard is spent using them. In fairness I must point out that (a) my previous spreadsheet has been with the Visicalc style of cell-reference and (b) that Multiplan has some compensations for this minor irritation with some excellent other features and facilities.

Commands

Thus far, we have looked at Multiplan’s basic essential facilities, but of course there are many other, typically more peripheral (in both senses!), functions needed to provide a comprehensive spreadsheet system. These extra functions are provided for by Multiplan commands, and invoked by selection from a command-menu.

Actually, in passing, we have already touched upon four commands provided by Multiplan – ‘Go-to’ cell, ‘Alpha’ for entering text, ‘Copy’ for replicating cells, and ‘Window’ for the split-screen facility. There are in fact 20 in all, each starting with a different letter of the alphabet, and all permanently displayed at the bottom of the screen. Bearing in mind that there were only six letters of the alphabet to spare, the implementers have done a pretty good job of choosing 20 sensible names – probably the worst one is ‘Alpha’ (it couldn’t be ‘Text’ because that clashes with ‘Transfer’ and ‘Transfer’ couldn’t be ‘File’, ‘Storage’ or ‘Disk’ because F, S and D are in use, etc).

Anyway, in the unlikely event that a command’s meaning is unknown, or in the more probable event that the precise method of usage is unclear, there is an excellent ‘Help’ facility available. Basically the list of command names has its own cursor, which can be shifted along by pushing the space bar. Commands can be selected by moving the command-cursor then pushing ‘Return’ (or by just typing the command’s first letter – much quicker). However, if ‘?’ is hit instead of ‘Return’ the spreadsheet screen is replaced with a ‘help’ screen for the currently indicated command. Moreover the information is not just a few cryptic instructions, but a fairly comprehensive run-down which in some instances extends to several pages. By the way, all the help-screen information is read from disk when needed, and does not affect the precious memory allocation for the spreadsheet itself.

To get some idea of the command facilities available, here is a quick rundown of all 20:

  • Enables text to be entered at the current cursor position.
  • Blanks out one or more cells. Contents are blanked out, but display format assigned to cell is unchanged. Not the same as Delete since, in particular, the following rows or columns are not shifted.
  • Copies cells from one place to another (ie, replication). Relative-copy is not possible (see text above) – must do absolute copy of relative formula!
  • Deletes a row or column of cells, moving all subsequent rows/columns back by one.
  • Instead of correcting a long formula by retyping from scratch, this command can be used to apply the changes quickly.
  • Numerous different display formats are possible: different column widths, centre, left, right justify, scientific, integer, financial, primitive bar graph, and more besides! As an extra convenience, a default format can be specified, assigning the format you most expect to use to all cells not explicitly reformatted to something else.
  • Go to cell specified by its name or coordinates.
  • Gives general help information, not covered by the help-screens, for each specific command.
  • Inserts a blank row or column, moving all subsequent rows/columns along by one.
  • Locks or unlocks specified cells. Can permanently lock all formulae – useful for turnkey systems.
  • Moves a row or column to between two other row/columns.
  • Enables a cell or group of cells to be given a user-supplied name. This name can be used in formulae, and also by the ‘Goto’ command. It saves confusion if the name here is the same as the visible title.
  • Used to set basic operational features, eg, switch off auto-recalculation or audible error beeps. The former is very useful when the spreadsheet is getting fairly full and every change takes several seconds – not to be registered on the screen, but for its effects to permeate through the system. The latter is absolutely priceless if you work at home and your family ‘can’t stand that incessant cheeping’ (to quote my good lady).
  • Can print to printer or disk file. Option to print the formulae as well as the calculated values. This is useful for documenting or debugging the model. It’s also possible to print selected areas.
  • Finish – back to resident operating system (eg, CP/M, MS-DOS, etc).
  • Sorts calculated or entered numbers or text by suitably shuffling rows.
  • Load, save, delete and other disk file operations. Of particular note: Multiplan can read Visicalc data files, or read/write files in a well-documented external interchange format, as well as using its own internal disk format. As it can also print to disk, it is extremely versatile in its file-handling.
  • Can optionally be used for entering formulae or numbers.
  • Split screen facility.
  • Used to read in answers calculated by one spreadsheet as raw input data for another. Can be used for ‘consolidation’.

Documentation

The documentation is comprehensive, clear and well-written. The bulk of it is in a stout ring-bound manual (minor niggle – the rings are not circular and tend to snag the pages when you are turning them quickly). It has obviously been put together with the sort of thoroughness we would expect from Microsoft, right from the Contents page at the front to the Index at the back. The basic material provided is:

  • System-specific instructions. How to create your working disks under your particular operating system.
  • Organised as seven lessons. Gives you key by key instructions, starting with simple cursor moves in lesson one through to multiple work-sheets at the end. Well illustrated.
  • In alphabetical order, everything you need to know about the command, key-strokes and formula-functions. Also includes a list of all system messages, together with advice on what to do when you encounter them.
  • Extra helpful information, including a glossary and notes for Visicalc experts – a nice touch!
  • Quick Reference Guide. A separate pocket book (16 pages), being a condensation of the reference section in the main manual.
  • Help Screens. Comprehensive instructions on-screen for every command and a few of the other facilities.
  • With this breadth of documentation, there should be something to please all levels of user. Complete beginners can try the tutorial. Experts will probably just use the quick reference guide or help-screens and everyone can make good use of the comprehensive index.

Sirius slip-up

Having given the Apple version a thorough work-over, I arranged a joyride on somebody else’s Sirius. The article was nearly complete – I just needed to pencil in the Sirius Benchmark times and then off to Mustique for yet another three weeks.

First problem: Sirius version of Multiplan manual temporarily mislaid. Well, I should know the system well enough by now. So, in preparation for Benchmark 1, I quickly set up the first 12 columns by 200 rows of the spreadsheet. (Readers familiar with the benchtests will know that this results in a display of 1.. 12 in the first row, 13. . 24 in the second, etc.)

Next I needed to set up column 13, each cell in it being the sum of the previous 12 in the row. Easy! Just use the row-sum function in column 13 of row 1, and then copy it down to all cells below it. Unfortunately I couldn’t remember the correct syntax for using it. Anyway, after experimentation I found that ‘SUM(C1:C12)’ at least did not give a formula error message, but it did seem to be displaying the wrong answer. Okay – time to copy it. Well, much disk-whirring and clanking, then watch the calculation count-down on the VDU display. 45 minutes later; I’m still waiting and the disk is still whirring and clanking and countdown’s still not finished – I’m frightened to switch off in case I corrupt the disk (it’s not mine, anyway) – can’t stop it at the keyboard, etc. Anyway it took about 50 frustrating minutes.

So, what went wrong? Well, basically a minor slip-up in my use of the SUM formula. I eventually got it right (by using a help-screen, what else?): ‘SUM(RC[-12]:RC[-1])’ and the whole test was over in under a minute. The formula I had originally used did not add the row up, but calculated the whole 12 x 200 array of numbers, and of course this formula was then copied 200 times down the column – a bit of a hefty number-crunch!

Anyway, the moral of this story is: make a good effort to learn Multiplan’s cell referencing – it could save you a long wait!

Conclusion

We have taken a fairly fast swoop right through the major facilities and features of Multiplan; so fast that some very valuable features, not generally available in mere state-of-the-art spreadsheet systems, may have gone unnoticed. Just for the record.

Multiplan gives you:

  • If you need to sort columns of figures or text then it is impossible to do this without a ‘Sort’ command.
  • Multiple worksheets. Results from one worksheet can be communicated to another, useful for consolidation.
  • Multiple split-screens. Very flexible facility to design VDU screen display of spreadsheet.
  • Flexible file handling. In particular data interchange with other software is feasible, and Visicalc data files can be read (but not written! – no doubt Microsoft doesn’t want to encourage users to migrate that way!).
  • Available on 16-bit microprocessor (8088/6). The new 16-bit processors can handle a lot more memory, and spreadsheet systems which have been properly installed on them can use this extra memory for setting up bigger spreadsheets (see Benchmarks).
  • Comprehensive help-screens. In addition to these. Multiplan also provides more mundane, but by no means universally available, facilities – such as cell references by names, formula protection, formula printout, print to disk and formula editing.

Certainly Multiplan has a lot of facilities to offer, but what is it like to use? Well some minor complaints here: the row/column numbering scheme increases the amount of typing for formulae. You have to consider replication consequences when you enter a formula, rather than when you do the replication, you have to choose the ‘Alpha’ command before you enter text (okay, it’s only one extra character, but most other spreadsheet systems don’t do it this way). To balance these minor grumbles are comprehensive error messages, and understandable prompts for all input.

So finally, my advice to spreadsheetless owners of Apples, CP/M or MS-DOS systems, or to anyone looking for an upgrade: put it near the top of your list!

Benchmarks and other measurements

These tests were run on an Apple II system with 64k of RAM (which is in fact mandatory) and an 80-column display card (which is optional). Available space for the spreadsheet itself amounted to 21k. Figures are also included for the Sirius (with 128k of RAM, and theoretically extendable to 800k+), running MS-DOS and allowing greater storage space for the spreadsheet. Where the Sirius figures are different they are appended in parentheses after the Apple figures.

Incidentally, a Sirius retails for around £2500, and the nearest equivalent Apple system (but with lower disk capacity, half the RAM, 8-bit processor) would be around £1750.

  • Spreadsheet size: 63 columns wide by 255 rows.
  • Numeric precision: 14 digits.
  • Max column width: 32 characters.

The benchmark tests are described in ‘Which Spreadsheet’, PCW Feb 1983.

Benchmark 1: (a) max rows accommodated: 95 (235); (b) recalculation time: 60 (55) seconds – ie, 1.5 (4) rows per second: (c) recalculation time: 60 (55) seconds; (d) vertical scrolling: 6 (6) rows per second; horizontal scrolling: 4 (4) columns per second.

Benchmarks 2: max rows of text accommodated: 190 (Sirius not tested).

Benchmark 3: max rows of numbers accommodated: 190 (Sirius not tested).

Price: Around £150.

Checklist

Documentation: 400+ pages, contents, tutorial, reference, index, quick reference and help-screens. Well-illustrated. Excellent.

User-friendliness: Consistent and easy to use — cell-referencing can be a little tricky!

Error-handling: 20+ error messages. Erroneous calculations (eg, zero-divides) displayed as special error values.

Facilities: Arithmetic and other functions: +, -, *, /, %, string operations, logic, descriptive statistics, trig, logs, look-up and more besides!

Configuration: version tested easily configured for different types of Apple screen.

Graphics: a let-down compared with the other facilities!

Interface to other software: specifically can read Visicalc files, and print to disk. Can also be interfaced to other software using data interchange format (requires programming skills to do this).

Spreadsheet overlays: yes – can do consolidation or merge information into existing spreadsheet.

Turnkey: Apple version is turnkey with all disk formatting, copying, etc, achievable without recourse to Apple DOS.

Insertion, deletion and replication: yes.

Display flexibility: just about everything you could possibly want. Excellent.

Protected cells: yes.

Formula printout: yes.

Formula editing: yes.

Automatic/manual recalculation: yes.

Out of memory: memory left permanently displayed. Recovers correctly when it runs out of memory.

Long jumps: can jump directly to any specified cell.

Sorts, searching and logic: yes.

First published in Personal Computer World magazine, April 1983

Data Management to the Rescue?

Kathy Lang checks out a flexible new CP/M package.

Regular readers will know that many of the packages I’ve reviewed in this series have particular areas of strength that make them well suited to certain areas of data management. This month’s offering, a British package called Rescue, which comes from Microcomputer Business Systems and runs under CP/M, is a general-purpose, menu driven data management package which has much in common with others in this field. But it has unusually flexible provision for different types of information, and its data validation is among the best I’ve seen.

Rescue comes in three parts: the first deals with configuring the system for your computer, and is not needed again unless you make major changes. The second part covers the creation and amendment of the data files, and of the screen and report formats, while the third permits record amendment and display. This separation makes it easy to set up a system in which most users have access to the information in the files, but cannot change the format of those files or interfere with any provision for protecting parts of the data for security reasons.

Data is stored in fixed-length records in Rescue, but some ingenious methods are used to keep data storage to a minimum – I’ll say more about that later. Once you’ve set up a record format, you can still add fields to the end of the records, but you can’t change the sizes of existing fields unless you’ve made provision for that in advance. (MBS is apparently about to release an option to permit more radical changes to existing files, but it isn’t available yet). You can access the records in two ways. Individual fields may be used as keys, and any one of them used to access a particular record for display and/or editing. You can also select subsets of the data by setting up a set of selection rules, which are used to extract a set of records for browsing on the screen or for printing. You can set up as many screen and report definitions as you please for any set of data; these definitions need describe only a few fields in a record if necessary, and any or all of these descriptions may be password protected.

Rescue is used through menus, but users can set up their own menus through quite simple procedures. Thus you can set up a series of operations to be activated by one menu option. You can’t at present access one file from another, so that the current version of Rescue does not have true database capabilities.

Constraints

Figure 1 shows the major constraints imposed by Rescue. The maximum record size of 1024 is the same as several others I’ve reviewed, but Rescue’s dictionary capability makes it more economical of data storage than many.

Some people will find the limitation of 60 characters in a field more serious. I haven’t included in the figure a full list of the field types allowed, as it is very lengthy. Virtually any kind of data format can be expressed with one of the field types provided. I’ll say more about them in the next section.

File creation

The process of file creation is shown in Figure 2, which is a ‘road map’ of all the menus associated with the data definition part of Rescue.

The first stage in file creation involves setting up a data description file, specifying the basic format of each record and the keys it will have. At this stage you must assign a data type to each field. There are four main groups of data alphanumeric, numeric, date, and dictionary. There are several forms of data type in each group; for instance, character data may be just that and contain any valid ASCII character, or they may be alphanumeric, in which case they may only contain letters or digits and any attempt to enter invalid data will be rejected by the system. There is quite a variety of numeric fields, too, including money (sterling). You can specify that a field is to conform to a mask, to ensure that such items as account references, which often have prescribed formats, are entered in a valid form.

Probably the most unusual type of data is the dictionary field, which permits the person entering data to include only certain values. There are two kinds of dictionary field; a short form, which permits up to 29 characters in total to be used for each field, and a long form, which allows up to 255 entries, each of up to 60 characters. The latter are shared among all the fields in the file, so supposing one has a series of questions each with the same range of answers – for example, answers ranging from Poor to Excellent in a market research survey – you only need one dictionary entry for all the fields to refer to. Each response takes up only one character in the record in the data file for either type of dictionary, so the method is really a way of combining coding with captions for codes.

Every field within the record must also fall into one of four entry categories: mandatory (ie, the field must always have a value), optional (the field may be empty), calculated or display-only. Calculated fields are derived from calculations on constants or on other fields in the same record. Display-only fields are provided so that for certain modes of access fields can be shown but not altered – account numbers might for instance be protected in this way. Any field in a record may also be linked to others in a number of ways.

Direct linkage provides for situations where some fields only have values if another field – said to be the controlling field – has a certain value. For instance, details about a property might say if the property were freehold or leasehold but only if it were leasehold would it be sensible to ask for the life of the lease and the annual charge. This approach can also be used to deal with records with lists of information; you might want to store the names of all a person’s children where some people might have as many as six, without asking six questions about childless people. Most packages expect you at least to hit one key for each question when entering data from the keyboard but with the Rescue approach entry can be more finely tuned to stop
prompting for answers if they are not needed.

During file definition you must also specify the fields which are to be used as keys. Rescue treats the key field which is physically nearest to the beginning of the record as the main key, in that you have to ask specifically for other keys when you come to access the file; so it can save a little time to think about what order to store fields in the record. Up to 10 fields may be defined as key fields. Keys may be either unique or duplicate, and Rescue checks when supposedly unique key values are entered. All the key fields are referenced from a single index, which is automatically kept up to date when data is added or amended.

The next step is to define screen and print formats for the records; you can have as many of these as you wish, and each may describe only parts of the record – for instance, to prevent confidential information being seen by everyone. Next, you tell Rescue to set up an empty data file and structure the index file, and finally you construct any custom-defined menus you will need If you do specify more than one screen or report definition, then you will have to do some customisation of the menus in order to use the alternative formats, but this is quite a straightforward process.

Input and editing

The provisions for data validation given by the dictionary facilities, by the variety of data types and by the range checking which can also be set up at file definition time, are extremely powerful – it’s always possible to get the data wrong in a logical sense, but Rescue makes it quite hard to get it wrong in any other sense. That said I did find the mechanics of correcting data a bit clumsy; if you’ve made a mistake and go back to edit a record you can say where in the record you want the editing to begin but from there you must work sequentially through – you can’t work back up the screen either when entering or editing data. Since the program requires you to have a terminal which can move the cursor left and right, it seems a bit strange not to utilise cursor movement up as well, since no terminal is likely to have horizontal movement but not vertical…

When you retrieve records for amendment, you do so by specifying a particular key value; you can specify the use of any key, but you have to get the value of the first four or five characters exactly right (except that Rescue is ‘case-blind’ in this situation, so it will for instance match Smith and smith). Even when matching exactly on a key value you may retrieve more than one record, as duplicate keys are allowed. But searching for field values within ranges is only possible when you want to look at records, not when you want to change them.

Screen display

I said that you can have several definitions for a single file, so that records can be displayed on the screen in different ways for different users or applications. These screen definitions can be created by copying existing definitions and amending them, but I couldn’t find a way to see what definitions I already had except by going out to CP/M and using the Directory command. Screen layout is specified by giving row and column coordinates for each field you want to display, which I found much more difficult to use than the ‘paint-a-screen’ approach which has become fairly common. The coordinate approach also makes it more difficult to amend the layout, though Rescue does have one provision to make this a little easier by letting you specify a re-ordering of the display without changing the absolute coordinates.

The screen layouts are set up in the ‘definition’ part of Rescue. However, they are invoked from the main part of Rescue, through executing one of the options in the menus shown in Figure 3. Display can be of records specified either by matching one key, or by selection using the selection and extraction procedure which is described later.

Reporting

Rescue uses the same mechanism for printed reports as for screen display, so both are strictly record based. The only provision for aggregated information is totalling of numeric fields. It is possible to force page-breaks when values of particular fields change, but subtotalling is not provided. There is, however, a very flexible facility to interface with Wordstar and Mail/Merge, so it is easy to use them in combination with Rescue to write circular letters and concoct sets of standard paragraphs.

Selection

Rescue provides the ability to select parts of the data file for browsing, printing or further selection. The main method of doing this is to set up a set of selection rules in a file, and then to apply these to the data file to produce another file containing the selected records. The selection rules are very flexible: you have all the usual comparison operators (less than/greater than/equal to/not equal to) and data values can be compared with constants or with the values of other fields in the same record. Rules can be combined to provide ANDing and ORing within and between fields, and these combination facilities together with the NOT operator make it possible to select virtually any combination of values you could need. However, personally I don’t like the need to set up rules in a file, as it is rather cumbersome in practice; if you are using the standard facilities menus you must go to the ‘Maintain Rules’ menu (at the third level of menus), create the rules, then go back to the first level of menus and down to the third level ‘Extract and Sort’ menu to actually extract the records you need. Finally (from the same Extract menu) you can display or print the records that have been found. This provides a sharp contrast to the command language approach, in which one command will extract your records and a second at the same level will display them. However, you could tune the menus in Rescue to avoid some of this ponderousness, so it’s better in that sense than menu systems which you can’t adapt.

While actually comparing fields, upper and lower case letters are regarded as equivalent. You can use wild codes: ? will match any one character, * will match one or more characters. For dictionary fields, the order for comparison purposes is the order in the dictionary, so if you have a set of answers with Poor as the first and Excellent as the last Poor will be regarded as ‘less than’ Excellent even though P comes after E in the alphabet. This is usually what you want and with much coded data would be a very valuable feature.

Sorting

Rescue can sort a data file on up to five fields in one operation; the process is similar to selection and you can also combine selection and sorting to give a sorted extract file. Sorting is either in ascending or descending order, as with selection dictionary fields sort in their dictionary order (Poor before Excellent) rather than in alphabetical or numeric order. In addition ordinary character fields can be given a sort value which is different from their simple alphabetical order. This could be particularly useful where you had fields such as book titles which often have prefix words such as A or The, which you want to ignore for sorting purposes but wish to include as part of the field for printing (In most packages these prefix words must occupy a separate field, which will be empty for titles without a prefix word.)

Calculations

The calculation facilities in Rescue are quite powerful in the input phase, and practically non-existent after that. When you set up a data definition file, you can specify that a field is to be calculated from constants, or from combinations of other fields (including dictionary fields) in the same record. All the usual arithmetic operators are available. After input the only calculation you can request is totalling on printed reports; this is activated by requesting totalling of a field when a description file is set up. Up to 10 fields in any one description file may be set to be totalled.

Security

Protection in Rescue is of two kinds. It is possible to take the programs used in the Define stage off the run-time disk, so that the ordinary user can use file definitions and screen and report formats, but not amend them. At a more detailed level, password protection can be provided for particular data files, for individual description files (so that a user can be given access only to part of the data in a file) or for particular menu items in custom built menus (so that some users may have access to some functions but not others, while other users have greater facilities, but all within one menu). This is a flexible and powerful scheme, and should provide for most needs.

Stability and reliability

I didn’t have any problems over reliability with my use of Rescue. As to stability, new versions of Rescue, which are ‘cost options’, are intended to be compatible with existing versions. New features in the pipeline include a version for MS-DOS and a multi-user version.

Tailoring

As usual, the first task is to tailor Rescue for your particular terminal. This appeared quite straightforward (although, as is the common bad practice, you can’t be sure the tailoring has worked until you actually run the main Rescue suite). However, I had one misunderstanding which I never managed to sort out; this resulted in repeated prompts being printed on the same line as the error messages, which were thereby overlaid so that I couldn’t read the error message. I wasn’t able to discover whether this was an error in the software, the documentation or my interpretation of them and my Sirius manual, but it hasn’t happened to me before. While tailoring for the terminal, you can tell Rescue about cursor movement left and right but not about which keys move the cursor up and down, so much potential editing flexibility is lost.

Once into Rescue, the main tailoring facility is the ability to set up sequences of activities on custom-defined menus. This gets round some of the inflexibilities associated with menu-driven systems, and I found the approach quite easy to use.

Relations with outside

Rescue can write files in standard ASCII characters, using the ‘comma delimited’ format required by many other packages including specifically Wordstar’s Mail-Merge option. Thus you can set up files of information which you want included in circular letters or standard paragraphs, and then fire them off to Wordstar or another similar package.

Within Rescue you can include on a menu the ability to run another program, so it would be possible to tailor a menu to carry out a selection/printing sequence of this kind, called by Rescue ‘record processing’, without the user having to go back to CP/M. You can’t at the moment read external files of ASCII records into Rescue, though there is a menu option to do this already shown, which I’m told will be implemented in the very near future.

User image: software

Once again, your overall reaction to Rescue will be governed by whether you like menu-driven packages or not. I found the ability to tailor menus to provide facilities oriented to particular requirements a big help in mitigating the inflexibilities of menus. However, most users are likely to follow the well-established principle of ‘satisficing (a word coined by Herbert Simon the psycho-economist to describe the tendency to accept adequate or satisfactory results rather than go for the best possible) and only set up extra menus when they absolutely have to, for instance to access alternative screen layouts. So I suspect that mostly people will use the rather cumbersome standard menu facilities. I also had a rather mixed reaction to the complete separation of description of and access to the data files. Within an organisation which has a database administrator (who might simply be the boss in a small business) this could be a useful separation for security reasons, but it would be less helpful where the same person organises the data files and puts information into them, perhaps in a small office, one person business, etc.

Within the package itself, I as usual found some goodies and some nasties. The progress through the menus was orderly and logical and was made straightforward by the provision of the two ‘road maps’ which I show as Figures 2 and 3. The process of prompting was easy to understand. It would have been even easier if, when a question has a default response, this was displayed before the question is posed – in many cases the default is not shown even after you’ve accepted it unless you go back and edit the record concerned. Allowing the use of identifiable abbreviations, both for field names and for data values, is sensible.

I didn’t like the use of row and column coordinates when formatting screen displays and printed reports, especially as there is no default format so you always have to supply one. The ‘paint-a-screen’ approach is much easier in general than coordinate specification and if this is not supplied then there should at least be a default format with records displayed one field per line starting at the left of the screen or paper. I also found the inability to move back within a record when editing a real nuisance.

Documentation

The manual is basically a reference document but written in so much detail that it could be used to teach yourself about the package if you were reasonably familiar with data management terminology. However, the amount of detail makes it rather difficult to find your way around. Two goodies help a little in this: the use of emphasis within the text to call the readers attention to the most important parts of each section, and the printing of chapter headings right-aligned on each page (a real help to browsing at a general level). But the chapter names didn’t always make it easy to guess where a particular feature would be described, and since there was neither a detailed table of contents relating to each chapter nor an index, it was very hard to get from ‘now I’ve seen something about that feature somewhere’ to the exact part of the manual in question. Part of the remedy is close at hand, since if the ‘road maps’ (which perform most of the functions of a reference card) were annotated with the numbers of the sections documenting each menu item, readers would find it very much easier to locate the particular piece of information they need fast (As this article went to press, MBS issued an index for the manual, which should help.)

The other problem I had was that while each feature is documented in detail with examples of the particular feature, there are no examples of the display or use of groups of features. For instance, all the features of data entry are described in turn, but there is no figure showing how data definitions are displayed on the screen. Nothing bolsters a user’s confidence like some complete examples shown in real screen pictures!

I can’t resist ending this section by awarding MBS second prize so far in this year’s contest for manual typo errors, with ‘Data Validification’.

Costs and overheads

Rescue costs £295, and is available from MBS. To be realistic, you would need a disk system with the regular double-sided, double-density capacity of 370 Kbytes per drive on a two-drive floppy disk system, to enable you to have all the Rescue software on one disk drive and use the other for data I found the system very slow in loading individual program modules, which seemed to happen whenever I changed from one sub-menu to another. I was told that this was specific to the Sirius-Z80 card method of disk access, but I haven’t noticed the problem with other packages I’ve used. The times for actually running the Benchtests are shown in Figure 4. (Details of the tests were given in PCW December 1982.)

Conclusions

Rescue provides data management facilities through individual files. Data description facilities are very powerful. Rescue provides a variety of data types and validation features more extensive than any I have found before. These features also help to make Rescue much more economical on data storage than is usual in programs which use fixed length records. You can select and sort the data to provide pretty well any required subset but the process is rather cumbersome. Screen and report formats can be varied according to the needs of particular users, which makes it straightforward to protect particular data items; you can also permit users access only to certain Rescue features. Screen and report formats are described in a rather rigid way, and there are no default formats for easy initial use.

On the other hand, the ability to send data to and run Wordstars Mail-Merge option from within Rescue could be very valuable in some environments. Apart from the calculation features on data entry, the only calculating power within the package is the ability to total particular fields. The system is menu-driven, which can be ponderous in use, but you can if you wish design your own menus to mitigate this disadvantage to some extent. Rescue is in the main a single-file system – you cannot reference one file through data values in another. Provided this limitation is not a problem, you would find Rescue worth investigating, particularly if the variety of data types and the extensive data validation would be beneficial in your application.

Fig.1. Constraints  
Max no. files in one menu structure 20
Max file size CP/M limit or disk size, whichever is smaller
Max no. records 32760
Max size record 1024 characters (but good data compression methods)
Max no. fields 100
Max field size 60 characters, 14 digits
Max no. keyfields 10
Field types See text – several varieties of character, numeric, date (day/month/year), monetary (sterling), dictionary

Figure_002

Fig.2. ‘Roadmap’ of menus

Figure_003

Fig.3. Menu options

Fig.4. Benchmark times
BM1 Time to add 1 new field to each of 1000 records Setup time
BM2 Time to add 50 records interactively Scrolling time
BM3 Time to add 50 records “in a batch” NA
BM4 Time to access 50 records from 1000 sequentially on 25-character field 1 min 20 secs
BM5 Time to access 50 records from 1000 by index on 25-character field NA* (1-3 secs)
BM6 Time to index 1000 records on 25-character field 12 mins
BM7 Time to sort 1000 records on 5-character field 4 mins 10 secs
BM8 Time to calculate on 1 field per record and store result in record NA
BM9 Time to total 3 fields over 1000 records NA yet
BM10 Time to import a file of 1000 records NA yet
Note: NA=Not available. NA*=Not available as tested – key must match exactly.

 First published in Personal Computer magazine, April 1983