Apple Lisa

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Each month one of Microcomputer Printout’s team of experts gives a vast amount of free publicity to a product they happen to like. Julian Allason opted for Apple’s new LISA – because, quite simply, it works the way you do.

Soft Soap

Julian Allason is critical of LISA’s Software.

“A soft answer turneth away wrath” says the Bible’s book of Proverbs. And answers to the microcomputer problem come no softer than LISA. Indeed, so friendly is she that the doyen of micro dealers, Mike Sterland, professed himself worried that existing Apple clients might be jealous at the thought of mere newcomers enjoying her sundry charms.

There can be little double that what I suppose we must call the LISA operating system – although it is so transparent as to be invisible – is superbly executed. After a few minutes one is merrily scuttling the mouse across the table top; selecting here; opening there; consigning files to the waste basket, and drawing the prettiest of pictures. To the experienced hacker, the sheer joy of being able to see what files are open; what jobs remain to be done; whose birthday is impending; is little short of a revelation. Beginners soon take it for granted – which is perhaps the highest accolade of all.

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The movable mouse with its single ‘select’ button is used to point to a function on the screen

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But is the applications software (although again this is a term Apple wouldn’t dream of using) as good? I fear not.

Like the curate’s egg, it is good in parts. The authoritative Rosen Electronics Letter, describes them, with the exception of LISADrawer and LISAProject as ‘pedestrian versions of standard functions that have been better done elsewhere’. Quite so. The point, however, is the degree of integration between them. Unhappily, even this is not as comprehensive as it might have been. The LISAWrite word processor for example does not allow you to insert information from the other applications, except by adding an extra page to the document you are working from.

If you are the sort of writer who needs fancy functions like footnote management and indexing, you would be frankly better off with Wordstar (and it is just a matter of time before that appears on LISA). On the other hand LISAWrite gives you lots of type faces and sizes to play with. And you can print them all out exactly as they appear on the screen, using both Apple’s new dot matrix printer, and, amazingly, the daisywheel printer. Most of the usual functions for manipulating text are there, and in my humble judgement, the program is more than adequate.

Much the same judgement must apply to LISACalc, which would be a fairly run-of-the-mill first generation spreadsheet if it didn’t offer variable column widths and one or two other goodies. One criticism levelled at it is the absence of multi-sheet consolidation, a feature which might have been expected to appeal to the corporate users who supposedly constitute LISA’s target market.

LISAGraph offers the usual types of business graphs in four different sizes. Thanks to the 720×364 dot resolution of the 12” screen, they look a lot better than on most other micros. Up to seven different sets of data can be held, and converted into graphic form.

This data can either be keyed in directly as a set of values, or moused over from the Calc program. The point that caught the eye of almost all lucky enough to have had a sneak preview of the system, was the way in which the graphs change automatically following any amendment to the data. Clever stuff!

LISA Terminal is optional, and it sounds like, and emulates DEC VT100 and VT52 modem and terminals. IBM 3270 emulation is likely to be included by the time LISA goes on sale here sometime this summer (is September still the summer? “It’s real hot out here in September,” says my chum in Cupertino with a wink).

And now the exciting bits. LISADraw is astonishing. If you’re drunk it will even straighten out your lines. Combine it with LISAGraph or LISAProject and the results get to look very professional indeed. The first time I saw LISA the demonstrator, Apple’s Brian Reynolds, created first one, then a whole series of drawings of LISA just by selecting from lines, shapes and shading with the mouse. And, Apple II users please note, text can go anywhere on the screen.

LISAProject is for critical path analysts. I’m no expert on project management, but even I could understand the schedules when they were displayed in graphical form, showing the critical paths amongst tasks, represented by boxes containing the details of the resources required, and milestones. In true calc fashion the critical path can be changed to take into account changes in resources – more Irishmen hired, a compressor stolen, for example – or unexpected delays. Once the output has been tarted up using LISADraw, the results are well up to management consultancy standards.

The last application is LISAList which is really a sort of database for dumbos. I’m not sure why it’s been billed as a list management package as several of the more standard mailing list functions seem to be missing; ditto a proper report generator.

Apple would probably argue that LISAList is intended for general use rather than high powered mailing or database management. Packages dedicated to precisely these applications may be expected sometime in the future. Quite when, however, remains a bit of a mystery. As I write, more than a month after the launch, the LISA development toolkit has yet to appear, and latest word is that it is unlikely to be before June. Without it third party software houses are going to have difficulty writing any applications programs that exploit LISA’s true capabilities. Without those programs LISA could turn into a seven month wonder.

The computer supports Pascal, BASIC, and COBOL languages so the problems are hardly insoluble. The onus must also be on Apple to get out and sell LISA in quantity. These self-same software houses subscribe to a strictly commercial code. Commandment 1 of this states that Thou Shalt Only Convert Software for Machines with a Large User Base’.

So different and so special is LISA it can truly be said to have a user base of zero.

But perhaps not for long. I, for one, have placed my order.

Lisa – An Expensive Lady?

In counterpoint to the otherwise noisy proceedings at LISA’s launch was the silence that greeted the announcement of the price – the sterling equivalent of $10,000 plus travelling expenses.

With the pound sick, and the gnomes tremulous, that translates to something like £7,500 – a lot of anyone’s money for what is still essentially a personal computer. Have Apple blown LISA’s chances then?

Some of the more cynical dealers thought not. “No one knows better what the market will bear than Keith Hall,” remarked one computer retailer, who had known the rugger-playing Sales Director in his incarnation as Commodore’s marketing mafioso. The existence of a market at that sort of price level is certainly not in doubt. Xerox have demonstrated that by selling every 8010 work station – the only piece of hardware remotely comparable to LISA – at over £11,000 each.

The other conclusion reached by the trade, after the customary head scratching, was that when LISA does arrive it could be in short supply. Indeed Apple have already indicated their intention of restricting LISA dealerships to a select few. The official explanation is that only the most experienced business systems houses would be able to do justice to the new baby. Quite how this squares with Apple’s claim (probably justifiable) that LISA is so easy to use that it can be learned in twenty minutes, is anyone’s guess.

Rumour, that oft ill-informed lady, has it that the original UK target price was £6,500; that was before the gnomes weighed in and sterling tumbled. There seems also to have been genuine disagreement on price within Apple. Sources close to the company’s Cupertino headquarters talk of two distinct schools of thought, one favouring a ’low’ price around the $8,000 mark with a view to maximising the company’s advantage in being first. A second group is said to have canvassed a $12,000 price tag on the basis that this would generate the optimum revenue, given the inevitable supply problems during the first year.

In the event, Apple’s chief executive, Mike Markkula, seemed to have split the difference, conscious perhaps that LISA’s market lead had been whittled down by successive software delays.

The unknown factor in the LISA price equation is Macintosh, LISA’s little brother. The conundrum now entertaining Cupertino’s corporate types is this: how cheaply can we make Little Mac?

Like LISA Macintosh is based on the Motorola 68000 16-bit microprocessor. Like LISA it should run much the same software. But will it? Like Topsy, LISA’s software just grew and grew and now occupies more than two megabytes of memory in all. Any possibility of marketing a floppy only version of LISA went out of the window more than a year ago; hence the presence of the separately boxed Profile five megabyte hard disk. Exactly the same problem now arises with Little Mac.

One theory now current amongst Apple watchers proposes $10,000 as an artificially high price for LISA, simply in order to maintain market separation from Macintosh. All this speculation – for speculation it largely is – is based on the assumption that LISA is overpriced. But is it? Try as one may, it is hard to put together a 68000-based system with Hi Res graphics, a megabyte of RAM, five megabytes of Winchester storage and half a dozen or so applications packages and still find oneself with much change from £8,000. And what price user friendliness?

LISA may not be within reach of everyone’s pocket, but it certainly looks like good value to me.

Which side of the Blanket?

Julian Allason examines Lisa’s parentage…

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The Xerox Star was the first workstation to employ the multiple-window technique. More recently Visicorp announced Vision for the IBM PC.

Frowns outweighed smiles as microcomputer folk reacted to the launch of Apple’s LISA computer last month.

The most maniacal grin adorned the visage of Apple’s rugger playing Marketing Director, Keith Hall, as he exhorted his dealers into orgasms of excitement at the prospect of selling the wonder micro.

The details of LISA, which will not have come as a very great surprise to readers of this organ, brought a furrow to the brows of competitors. “Now everyone will want integrated software,” moaned one small British microcomputer manufacturer. “Look how long that took Apple to develop – and we don’t have a fraction of their resources.”

Ecstasy was also less than unanimous amongst dealers. “Apple have wrecked the market. I’ve already had two of my best customers call to put a freeze on further orders. The worst part is that Apple won’t even be able to deliver LISAs for six months and then not in any quantity,” complained one member of the Computer Retailers’ Association.

Wry smiles were the order of the day in Uxbridge, headquarters of Xerox, makers of LISAs only competitor, the 8010 workstation, otherwise known as the Star. As noted elsewhere on these pages, LISA owes much of its heritage to work done at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center. Work that culminated in the Alto prototype user friendly computer. From the Alto – so far the only personal computer to have achieved true cult status – sprang from the aforementioned Star.

When industry pundits take a step back from the trees to inspect the wood, they will notice something very odd. Working from the same starting point, Apple reached a very different – one is tempted to say the opposite – conclusion from Xerox. For the Star is viewed by Xerox as a workstation for their Ethernet local area network. Apple, on the other hand, are adamant that LISA is a one-man machine, a personal computer that will adorn the desk of professional managers.

It is a curious conflict and one is tempted to wonder whether both companies can be right.

In truth not even Apple are convinced that they enjoy a monopoly of wisdom. As one senior manager remarked, after looking round to ensure that we were not being overhead, “In scientific circles the very best rows start with opposing conclusions being drawn from the same data…”

But it may not even be a two sided argument, because VisiCorp, whose VisiON operating environment has received the rough edge of Apple’s corporate tongue, think they are dealing with a very different sort of animal. If one could reconstruct the chain of evolution of the concepts first developed at Xerox PARC and Stanford University, it might go something like this: Alto user friendly personal computer becomes the Star workstation, a single component in a network of stations sharing printing and file storage resources, but its principal function is to exchange information.

As a personal computer company, Apple find other aspects of the Alto more sympathetic. The use of multiple screen windows, the mouse as a pointer to them, and of icons (small graphic symbols) to indicate the status of the work in hand all appeal. The network emphasis less so. Apple see the integration of the most popular office applications as a means of closing the gap between computers and office functions as they are normally (i.e. manually) carried out.

At the bottom of the chain, or at least as far down as we can see for the nonce, is VisiCorp. In their world view the PARC concept is primarily a means of making applications programs more user friendly. Not surprisingly, the first programs to receive the VisiON treatment will be VisiCalc, VisiWord, VisiPlot, VisiTrend, Visi etc. And least anyone deprecate that, your correspondent would like to add that he was enormously impressed the first time he sat down with VisiON. Moreover, the system has received the imprimatur of mega-mini-computer-maker Digital Equipment Corporation. In the computer world this is the equivalent of not just a feather in the cap for VisiCorp, but a whole bird in their bonnet.

Whether future micro biological expeditions down this particular evolutionary train will be warranted in the future remains to be seen. Certainly there are some interesting growths under culture in the labs of Microsoft and Digital Research. Our microscopes will be trained in their direction over the coming months…

First published in Microcomputer Printout magazine, April 1983

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